Month: October 2014

Android: “And You”

“And You, And Him, And Them, And These, And Why Not…”

Taking advantage of the name, this Samsung advertisement portrays the endless “and’s” that are possible with the Android. The fun, quirky nature of the video stresses modern values and beliefs, implying that Android is both in the Now and the Future. There isn’t a generation left out, or even, it would seem, a demographic. You have the crazy sports fans, the family in the pool, the old guy playing the trombone, the monkey…?

This fast-paced commercial cuts from one “and” moment to the next, depicting the various ways you can use an Android to your benefit — all to the tune of the intense single, “Party Hard” by Andrew W.K. The shots include multiple people (or animated characters) together, engaging in a variety of different activities, hence the tagline: “Be Together, Not The Same.” While about half of the video shots are dedicated to showing attributes of Androids (they can be large, small, go underwater, be worn on your wrist, etc.), the other half have absolutely nothing to do with the product, but rather the brand; there is an assortment of people, activities, camera angles — it’s all there to show the diversity and fun-loving nature of the brand and, when watched in sequence, it works. You feel included, inspired; And You.

This ad combines humor, diversity, and excitement to try to reach the consumer, while this similar, yet somewhat contrasting ad (http://vimeo.com/109756827) uses the pathos appeal instead, motivating viewers to make an “and move;” to be different while being together; to move forward. It’s pace is much slower, and it’s focus is to inspire, with dialogue about inviting the new kid to sit at your table, and shots of Martin Luther King Jr. giving a speech. They call it an “And View.” They want being progressive to be synonymous with being an Android customer, and whether it’s executed through fast shots and loud music, or slower-paced videos with an encouraging voice over, the message is the same. Everyone is different, everyone has something to contribute to society, and, of course, everyone should have an Android.

Android.

#TogetherNotTheSame

Medicinal Advertising: Serious Turned Sensual

That’s some sexy…medicine you have there?

We’re all used to advertisements with sexy women persuading the viewer to do something, buy something, use something. From cosmetic products, to home appliances, to Big Macs; we get it, sex sells — while it’s not the most original or creative avenue — it sells.

First, I’d like to talk credibility. After viewing this, all the audience (men) really know, is that they would very much like to be in a tropical location, lying in bed next to the hot blonde featured in the ad. What information do we really leave with though, besides the serious warnings about losing eyesight, which run against images of this same woman performing her slow motion walk around the island, stopping occasionally to give the camera a “come hither” look? They probably didn’t catch much of that, and then proceed to “talk to [their] doctor about Viagra.”

It’s somewhat of a domino effect, as now the doctor feels pressure to prescribe said medication, when perhaps the patient isn’t in need of it, or would be better off with a different drug/brand/dosage. The point is, there are several reasons why advertising of medicinal products does more harm than good. Sure it “educates” the consumer, but does it really, or is it simply convincing them that they need said medication?

Not to mention (and I’ve never understood this phrase, since I am in fact about to mention it) all of the products that get their patents renewed by adding one inactive ingredient, and slapping a new name on it; and occasionally even creating a whole new illness that you are now convinced you must have (“Ever get tired, moody, hungry? If this sounds like you, then HELLO, YOU’RE A HUMAN BEING. CONGRATULATIONS!”). Or the fact that these advertisements are not viewed or approved by the FDA, or any government agency for that matter, before airing. Sort of like how tap water is more regulated than bottled water, yet we are fiends for any water that is bottled or “exotic,” but I digress.

If you want to hire a top model to devour your burger in a string bikini, fine. But that scenario shouldn’t translate into the medical profession. You see, I used the word “profession,” to indicate that it should be run by professionals, in a professional manner. It is your doctor’s job to PRESCRIBE medication, not their advertising agency’s job to PERSUADE you to use it.

Lexus-Nexus: “Amazing in Motion”

A nexus is a “connection between things linked in a series;” the links between the series of figures lighting up as they journey through the city; the connection between a luxury car brand and this awe-inspiring commercial. (I will admit that when the word “nexus” came to mind, I actually confused Lexus with the legal research corporation, LexisNexis.)

No doubt catering to our desire for thrill, Stink agency came up with something bold and risky, and presumably very, very expensive. As viewers, we have no insight into what is going on until the last second of the ad. And then we’re still not sure, but we know it was different, we know it was intriguing, and most importantly, we know it was Lexus.

The figure starts out lying flat on the ground, gets up, and begins his venture through the city — doing flips, diving into a pool, scaling building walls, and free falling off of a skyscraper. All of this just to land flawlessly on top of a brand new Lexus. Not event to get into it, mind you. Not to mention that the only time we actually see the brand’s name is the last split-second of the advertisement. Gutsy Lexus, very gutsy. But don’t worry, no one is changing the channel before we see how it ends. As Americans, we are captivated by shiny things and bright lights….check and check! Without any dialogue, the song Running, by Computer Magic, compliments the figure beautifully as he travels through time and space. Ironically, part of the song’s lyrics say “I haven’t got anywhere to go;” that is, I suppose, until he finds the Lexus.